Teaching Through COVID-19

Overview

In the event that educational experiences cannot take place in person, it will be critical that you are prepared and communicate with students how content will be delivered and what the expectations are for courses and clerkships. 

General Recommendations

  • Plan to post an announcement in Canvas. Provide information on how you will conduct class and what students should plan to do to fulfill course requirements.
  • Keep a copy of student email addresses. Sending the class an email that duplicates an announcement can serve as a secondary method of communication for cases when students have turned off announcement notifications. 
  • Tell students to make sure all communication notification settings in Canvas are set to notify them immediately, and that this is a critical step during this time.
  • Make sure all course materials are digitized. These can be posted to Canvas now and kept unpublished if you don’t want students to see them until you need them to be available. 
  • Consider pre-recording lectures. These can be used in many situations. See below for asynchronous content delivery. 
  • Use information created by Indiana University for general tips on teaching in times when faculty and/or students cannot physically come to campus: https://keepteaching.iu.edu/ 
  • For questions or assistance, contact:
    Lorie Shuck, Director of Educational Technology
    (317) 278-1506
    lshuck@iu.edu or mdedtech@iu.edu

Section Resources

Delivering Lectures

Synchronous Presentations using Zoom

Important: If your lecture contains PHI, you may not use Zoom, unless you have switched to a Zoom Health Account or you have removed PHI from your content.

You can use Zoom to deliver live lectures to students. Zoom is a freely available platform, supported by Indiana University. Zoom allows you to present a lecture in a similar way that you might in a lecture hall. You can share a PowerPoint presentation, turn on your computer’s webcam, and talk to the students, allowing them to see you, hear you, and see lecture content. Zoom can be installed on your computer without the need for admin rights. There is also a mobile app if you need to use Zoom when you don’t have an available computer.

The standard Zoom license at IU allows for up to 300 participants to be in a Zoom room at the same time. If your teaching plan may require more than 300 participants at one time, contact Educational Technology for assistance with setting up a Zoom Large Meeting or Webinar.

Technical considerations

  • A good internet connection is necessary.
  • Audio is critical. Consider investing in at least a mid-range headset microphone. You can also use a built-in laptop microphone. Make sure you have a quiet location for the presentation and be sure to do an audio test beforehand.
  • Turning on your webcam is not essential, but it is a nice touch to help you connect with remote students. If you find that your internet connection isn’t as strong or as stable as it should be, turning off your webcam can help to improve the presentation.
  • Students can communicate with you by using the Zoom chat function or by turning on their microphones and speaking. Encourage students to keep their microphones muted when they are not speaking.
  • You may want to ask students to hold questions for built-in Q&A portions of your presentation. This can help with the flow of the online lecture.

Section Resources

Asynchronous Presentations using Kaltura

Important: If your lecture contains PHI, you may not use Kaltura. Remove PHI for asynchronous content delivery.

Lectures can be pre-recorded and stored using Kaltura tools to allow students to view a lecture at their convenience. Kaltura is a freely available video platform that is supported by Indiana University. 

Kaltura Personal Capture is available to install to Windows or Mac computers with no need for admin rights. With Personal Capture, you can record a voice-over PowerPoint presentation using your computer and microphone. When you have finished recording, you can upload the video to the Kaltura platform for storage and distribution to your students.  

Technical considerations

  • Audio is critical. Consider investing in at least a mid-range headset microphone. You can also use a built-in laptop microphone. Make sure you have a quiet location for the presentation and be sure to do a test with audio before recording the full presentation.
  • Kaltura Personal Capture allows you to also turn on your webcam which will display your video as a picture-in-picture to your students. This is optional, but many students appreciate being able to see the presenter. 
  • Consider creating a script that you will read for the recording. This upfront time saves a lot of time in recording and re-recording.
  • The normal attention span for viewing online recordings is much shorter than it would be in person. Aim for no more than 15 minutes for each video. If you have more content that needs to be delivered, break up the presentation into 15-minute parts.

Section Resources

Conducting Small Groups

  • Zoom can be used with either student-created rooms or breakout rooms. See instructions for both methods below.
  • Small group materials can be digitized ahead of time and delivered via Canvas
  • Some small group work could be reconfigured to be done asynchronously, using Canvas Discussions

Section Resources

Basic Configuration using Two Zoom Rooms

  • Zoom can be used for synchronous small group work.
    • Have each group designate a student representative to create a Zoom room and communicate the meeting URL with students and a facilitator
  • If a live overview and/or wrap up is essential to the small group session, use a separate Zoom room for this segment
    • Course director/site leader creates a Zoom room for overview/wrap up and distributes this to students
    • For the overview, all students are together in the large group room
    • Students are instructed to rejoin the large group room for the wrap up at a set time
    • When the overview concludes, students leave the large group room and join their small group Zoom room
  • Small group materials can be digitized ahead of time and delivered via Canvas
  • Some small group work could be reconfigured to be done asynchronously, using Canvas Discussions

Section Resources


Advanced Configuration using Zoom Breakout Rooms

  • Setting breakout rooms automatically
    • original groups stay intact when having multiple breakout sessions
    • original groups stay intact as long as all participants remain in meeting
    • if participant leaves meeting and returns, they will need to be manually added back to original group. Screenshot “groups” so you’ll be able to place participant back in their original group, if they leave or get kicked out
  • Setting breakout rooms manually
    • participants have to be in the Zoom meeting to be assigned to a breakout room
    • if participant leaves meeting and returns, they will need to be manually added back to original group. Screenshot “groups” so you’ll be able to place participant back in their original group, if they leave or get kicked out
  • Device age & internet connection plays a role in how quickly participants move back and forth in breakout rooms. On average, it takes about 5 seconds for participants to move into or back out of breakout rooms.
  • Only the Zoom meeting “Host” can create breakout rooms. 
  • Co-Hosts can move participants around
  • Breakout room recordings can only be done by a participant that has been given permission. Each breakout room would need to have a designated person to record.

Section Resources

Considerations for Labs

  • Look for videos that provide demonstrations.
  • Do a demonstration or illustration of your own by using Zoom or a personal recording.
  • Use a scenario and have students talk through how they would handle it
    • Synchronously delivery:  Use Zoom
    • Asynchronous delivery: Use Canvas Discussions 

Section Resources

Managing Exams

  • NBME exams: Reschedule the exam.
  • ExamSoft exams
  • An exam taken in a non-proctored environment will be open-book, open-note, and potentially collaborative. Perhaps rethink how to do an exam:
    • Allow open-book, open-note, but tell students to not collaborate (honor code).
    • Reduce the weight of the exam’s score on the final grade.
    • Create an oral exam.
    • Change the exam to a collaborative (e.g., small group) experience.
  • Exam Reviews: If secure reviews cannot be done in person, consider only providing Strengths and Opportunities reports.

Section Resources

Quarantined Students

The following tips can be used if a student has been quarantined and cannot come to class but the rest of the class is not affected. See the sections above for relevant information and links to resources.

Lectures

  • Use Zoom to let the student join a live lecture
  • Let the student watch the recording of a lecture

Small Group

  • Use Zoom to let the student join the live small group

Lab

  • Use Zoom to let the student observe the lab
  • Provide alternative videos for the student to view
  • Consider an alternative experience

Exam

  • Create a make-up exam for the student

Campus Closings

In Phase 1, if the host campus for one or more campuses closes but other campuses remain open, Course Management Teams (CMTs) will need to meet to determine how to allow students to continue with coursework based on the above recommendations. CMTs may also need to readjust the exam schedule.

Clinical Work

  • Search for existing online videos
  • Create modules in Canvas
  • Hold synchronous large group Zoom meetings with discussion opportunities